MSR Best Paper Award

2019 - AOM Annual Meetings - Boston

The Effect of Leader-Follower Congruence in Mindfulness on Relationship Quality Armin Pircher Verdorfer, TUM School of Management, Technische U. München (Monday, 11:30AM - 1:00PM at Marriott in Grand Ballroom Salon B)

A Roadmap for State Mindfulness Research Samantha Su-Hsien Sim, NOVA School of Business and Economics, Francesco Sguera, UCP - Católica Lisbon School of Business & Economics, Andrew Hafenbrack, U. of Washington (Monday, 3:00PM - 4:30PM at Marriott in Grand Ballroom Salon J)

The Influence of Confucianism and Buddhism on Family Business in Taiwan and Vietnam Irene Chu, Bradford School of Management (Monday, 4:45PM - 6:15PM at Boston Marriott Copley Place in Yarmouth)

Meaning in Work and Meaning at Work: Empirically Based Clarity of the Constructs Anirban Kar, Simon Fraser U.  & A R. Elangovan, U. of Victoria (Monday, 8:00AM - 9:30AM at Marriott in Grand Ballroom Salon B)

A Spiritual Aspect to Executive Coaching Stuart A. Allen, Robert Morris U. Louis W. Fry, Texas A&M U. Central Texas (Tuesday, 9:45AM - 11:15AM at Marriott in Grand Ballroom Salon B)

Developing Leaders to Serve, Developing Servants to Lead Nicole Alonso, U. of Houston, Jennifer Bragger, Montclair State U., Kayla D'Ambrosio, Ernst & Young, John Morgan, Lee Hecht Harrison, Valerie I. Sessa, Montclair State U. (Tuesday, 9:45AM - 11:15AM at Marriott in Grand Ballroom Salon B)



Monday August 12th  MSR Best Paper Awards

 

8:00am   Relationships in the Workplace

Program Session: 894 | Submission: 20301 | Sponsor(s): (MSR)
Scheduled: Monday, Aug 12 2019 8:00AM - 9:30AM at Boston Marriott Copley Place in Grand Ballroom Salon B

 Chair: Orneita BurtonAbilene Christian U.

 Discussant: Susan S. CaseCase Western Reserve U.

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Meaning in Work and Meaning at Work: Empirically Based Clarity of the Constructs

                             

 Author: Anirban KarSimon Fraser U. 

 Author: A R. ElangovanU. of Victoria 

              MSR Best Paper

Meaning in the context of work plays a significant role in many of our lives. Yet empirically grounded clarity about what the construct signifies is lacking. In our paper, we disaggregate meaning in the context of work to meaning in work and meaning at work (Pratt & Ashforth, 2003; Wrzesniewski, 2003). Using mixed methods approach we discover the dimensions of the two constructs based on qualitative (semi-structured interviews) and quantitative (survey and CFA) studies, develop robust scales to measure meaning in work and meaning at work, and probe the relationships between the two constructs based on qualitative (semi-structured and structured interviews) and quantitative (survey and CFA) studies. Our results clearly indicate that the empirically supported main dimensions of meaning in work are fulfilment, connection, perceived importance of the work and purpose of the work; that meaning at work is represented by a wider set of dimensions than we had envisaged based on the existing literature; and that the relationship between meaning in work and meaning at work is interesting and dynamic with several nuances. We conclude our paper by discussing the theoretical and empirical contributions, the managerial implications, and the future research areas.

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3:00pm Mindfulness Practice and Impact

Paper Session
Program Session: 1366 | Submission: 20266 | Sponsor(s): (MSR)
Scheduled: Monday, Aug 12 2019 3:00PM - 4:30PM at Boston Marriott Copley Place in Grand Ballroom Salon J

 Chair: Kathryn PavlovichWaikato Management School, U. of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

 Discussant: Ivana IgicU. of Bern

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A Roadmap for State Mindfulness Research 

 Author: Samantha Su-Hsien Sim, NOVA School of Business and Economics 

 Author: Francesco Sguera, UCP - Católica Lisbon School of Business & Economics 

 Author: Andrew Hafenbrack, U. of Washington

                              MSR Best Paper 

 The state mindfulness induction experimental paradigm allows researchers to examine the state level changes of mindfulness, as well as to observe psychological consequences. Yet, the methodological foundations of state mindfulness are still in their infancy. Towards further developing these methodological foundations, the present research investigated these research questions: What are effective ways to induce state mindfulness? How long of an induction is necessary to effectively induce state mindfulness? For whom does state mindfulness induction work? Why do state mindfulness inductions work? We conducted four studies in which participants were randomly assigned to mindfulness inductions and comparison conditions. Study 1 found that focused breathing and body scan inductions can be effective in increasing state mindfulness, altering temporal focus, and reducing state anxiety and perceived stress. However, two separate focused breathing inductions varied greatly in their effects on some of these outcomes. Study 2 found that at least 15 minutes of focused breathing induction is necessary to increase state mindfulness such that it is detectable compared to a no-meditation baseline state. Study 3, a meta-analysis, found that the efficacy of state mindfulness inductions is not moderated by meditation frequency. Study 4 compared different control conditions to a mindfulness induction in a way that further elucidates the mechanisms of mindfulness, including ego dissolution. We discuss implications for research and practice.

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4:45pm   Exploring Family Businesses

Paper Session
Program Session: 1484 | Submission: 20303 | Sponsor(s): (MSR)
Scheduled: Monday, Aug 12 2019 4:45PM - 6:15PM at Boston Marriott Copley Place in Yarmouth

 Chair: Louis W. FryTexas A&M U. Central Texas

 Discussant: Denise DanielsSeattle Pacific U.

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The Influence of Confucianism and Buddhism on Family Business in Taiwan and Vietnam 

Author: Irene Chu, Bradford School of Management

                      MSR Best Paper
 

 This paper explores the influence of Confucianism and Buddhism on family business practices and identity in Taiwan and Vietnam. Using concepts from institutional logics as a theoretical lens, the findings from two qualitative case studies are analyzed and compared in a cross-cultural study. The results demonstrate the interaction between the institutional logics of religion and the family in Taiwan, influencing individuals’ identities and schema and impacting organizational practices and identity. In contrast in the engaged Buddhist context of Vietnam, the influence of the family is lessened and the impact of Buddhist concepts such as impermanence, non-attachment and dependent arising on the individual are reflected in organizational practices such as succession planning and recruitment.

 

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Tuesday August 13th
 

9:45am   Spirituality, Leadership, and Coaching

Paper Session
Program Session: 1776 | Submission: 20300 | Sponsor(s): (MSR)
Scheduled: Tuesday, Aug 13 2019 9:45AM - 11:15AM at Boston Marriott Copley Place in

 Grand Ballroom Salon B

 Chair: Diana RajendranSwinburne Business School, Swinburne U. of Technology

 Discussant: Ian Stuart MercerAuburn U.

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A Spiritual Aspect to Executive Coaching 

 Author: Stuart A. Allen, Robert Morris U. 

 Author: Louis W. Fry, Texas A&M U. Central Texas 

                   MSR Best Paper

 Executive coaching (EC) has been recognized as an essential practice to support executive leaders’ development. However, there has also been a growing interest in the role of religion and spirituality in organizations and organizational leadership. This paper explores the inclusion of spiritual themes, including spiritual direction, in executive coaching by reviewing central concepts, benefits and challenges, practical approaches, and practice related questions relevant to executive coaches, consultants, and executive and organizational clients. In addition, we propose a model applying levels of being and knowing that can support spiritual support or direction in executive coaching. We argue in favor of executives having access to coaches who are skilled, knowledgeable, and experienced in addressing the basic spiritual aspects of executives’ lives, with potential for more specialized support from coaches trained in spiritual direction or through adjunctive support from an external spiritual director.

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Developing Leaders to Serve, Developing Servants to Lead 

 Author: Nicole Alonso, U. of Houston 

 Author: Jennifer Bragger, Montclair State U. 

 Author: Kayla D'Ambrosio, Ernst & Young 

 Author: John Morgan, Lee Hecht Harrison 

 Author: Valerie I. Sessa, Montclair State U. 

                      MSR Best Paper

In the past two decades, a plethora of research has found employing a servant leadership style results in positive individual and organizational outcomes (Hoch, Bommer, Dulebohn, & Wu, 2018.), but little research has investigated the antecedents of servant leadership (Liden, Panaccio, Meuser, Hu, & Wayne, 2014). In this paper, we propose that balanced and integrated development across cognitive, social, emotional, spiritual and moral domains results in a servant leader orientation and argue that despite numerous organizational barriers to this development, organizations can create contexts in which such integrated vertical development can facilitate a cycle of this leadership style. First, we review the benefits of servant leadership in today’s organizations and the most common dimensions of servant leadership. We then propose how balanced and integrated development facilitates a transition to a servant oriented style of leadership and consider the organizational barriers to the development into and demonstration of servant-oriented leadership. Lastly, we make suggestions for how organizations might create an environment conducive to developing servant leaders.